Great gatsby critical lens essay

His book is a perceptive and astute account of the time in which he obviously studied and then successfully captured the angst of society drama and the sadness of lost love and the promise that lurks just beneath the roar of the twenties. This novel is known the world over today as an accessible door into the history of that time period.

Great gatsby critical lens essay

Of all the themes, perhaps none is more well developed than that of social stratification. The Great Gatsby is regarded as a brilliant piece of social commentary, offering a vivid peek into American life in the s.

Fitzgerald carefully sets up his novel into distinct groups but, in the end, each group has its own problems to contend with, leaving a powerful reminder of what a precarious place the world really is.

By creating distinct social classes — old money, new money, and no money — Fitzgerald sends strong messages about the elitism running throughout every strata of society.

The first and most obvious group Fitzgerald attacks is, of course, the rich.

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However, for Fitzgerald and certainly his charactersplacing the rich all in one group together would be a great mistake. For many of those of modest means, the rich seem to be unified by their money.

However, Fitzgerald reveals this is not the case.

Great gatsby critical lens essay

In The Great Gatsby, Fitzgerald presents two distinct types of wealthy people. First, there are people like the Buchanans and Jordan Baker who were born into wealth.

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Their families have had money for many generations, hence they are "old money. Daisy, Tom, Jordan, and the distinct social class they represent are perhaps the story's most elitist group, imposing distinctions on the other people of wealth like Gatsby based not so much on how much money one has, but where that money came from and when it was acquired.

Great gatsby critical lens essay

For the "old money" people, the fact that Gatsby and countless other people like him in the s has only just recently acquired his money is reason enough to dislike him. In their way of thinking, he can't possibly have the same refinement, sensibility, and taste they have. Not only does he work for a living, but he comes from a low-class background which, in their opinion, means he cannot possibly be like them.

In many ways, the social elite are right. The "new money" people cannot be like them, and in many ways that works in their favor — those in society's highest echelon are not nice people at all.

They are judgmental and superficial, failing to look at the essence of the people around them and themselves, too. Instead, they live their lives in such a way as to perpetuate their sense of superiority — however unrealistic that may be.

The people with newly acquired wealth, though, aren't necessarily much better. Think of Gatsby's partygoers. They attend his parties, drink his liquor, and eat his food, never once taking the time to even meet their host nor do they even bother to wait for an invitation, they just show up.

When Gatsby dies, all the people who frequented his house every week mysteriously became busy elsewhere, abandoning Gatsby when he could no longer do anything for them.

One would like to think the newly wealthy would be more sensitive to the world around them — after all, it was only recently they were without money and most doors were closed to them.

As Fitzgerald shows, however, their concerns are largely living for the moment, steeped in partying and other forms of excess. Just as he did with people of money, Fitzgerald uses the people with no money to convey a strong message.

Nick, although he comes from a family with a bit of wealth, doesn't have nearly the capital of Gatsby or Tom. In the end, though, he shows himself to be an honorable and principled man, which is more than Tom exhibits.The Great Gatsby Critical Lens.

Taylor Tipping Critical Essay “The Great Gatsby” by F. Scott Fitzgerald is a novel in which the setting in time and place is a significant feature. In this essay I will show how the writer’s use of setting contributes to my understanding of character and theme.

Fitzgerald’s heroine, Daisy Buchanan, in The Great Gatsby is a typical product Critical Lens with Power Comes Great Responsibility Voltaire wisely said “With power comes great responsibility.

The Great Gatsby F. Scott Fitzgerald The Great Gatsby essays are academic essays for citation. These papers were written primarily by students and provide critical . The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald is a novel that goes underneath all the party, carefree living, and brings out the deeper meaning of society at the time. The Great Gatsby Critical Lens Throughout history information has been passed down through time from generation to generation. Literature is one of the most important aspect of a peoples’ culture that is passed down and inherited.

Great Gatsby Essay- Social, Critical, Gender Lens. Society as Seen Through the Novel “The Great Gatsby” by F. Scott Fitzgerald “Well-lit streets discourage sin, but don’t overdo it. Great Gatsby Essay- Social, Critical, Gender Lens The Moral Lens of The Great Gatsby F.

Scott Fitzgerald creates a world full of lessons in morality in his novel The Great Gatsby, with a character list featuring two or more people who embezzle, forge or steal to make money, three people having romantic affairs, and a few murderers. The Great Gatsby Critical Lens Essay – E Period.

For our culminating assignment based on our study of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s novel, The Great Gatsby, you will respond to the prompt below. The Great Gatsby Critical Lens Throughout history information has been passed down through time from generation to generation.

Literature is one of the most important aspect of a peoples’ culture that is passed down and inherited.

Great Gatsby Essay- Social, Critical, Gender Lens | Free Essays - yunusemremert.com